Wednesday, February 10, 2010

ABC Wednesdays - D for didgeridoo

The digeridoo is unique to our Australian aboriginal culture; originally from Arnhem Land, northern Australia. Digeridoos are made from limbs or tree trunks, eaten out by termites. They are cut to a length of about 1.3 metres and cleaned out by scraping or with hot coals.

I took this photo at last year's Come Out Festival; see related posts here and here.

The Didgeridoo is not normally played as a solo instrument; usually it is used to accompany a singer/dancer beating two sticks together.




The ABC Wednesday meme was initiated by Denise Nesbitt. To find out more about ABC Wednesdays and see other participants' contributions click here.

17 comments:

Sylvia K said...

How fascinating! I've heard of the digeridoo, but didn't really know much about it and this is great and I love your photos! Always so much fun to learn of other cultures! Hope your week is going well, Gordon!

Sylvia

Life with Kaishon said...

Oh my gosh. These pictures are amazing. Thanks for sharing this information about Australian culture with me today! : )

Manang Kim said...

A great information and I like the pictures too. Thanks for sharing!

D is for Dad

photowannabe said...

The digeredoo has such an interesting sound. Its very other worldly. Terrific photos if the instrument and performers.

Leif Hagen said...

Very intriguing! Never seen an instrument like that before your posting! Great photos!

Tumblewords: said...

Terrific photos. I've heard the sounds from a digeridoo but I've never seen one played. Thanks!!

Tarun Mitra said...

Great photos and description thanks for sharing..

Mar said...

I love that sound! interesting post and great shots.

D is for detail...

Andy said...

An interesting culture and interesting photos. Thanks.

Jay said...

What a great post! I remember the first time I heard a didgeridoo, and how fascinated I was to learn what they actually looked like.

On behalf of the team, thank you for taking part in ABC Wednesday this week! :)

Roger Owen Green said...

There was a controversy in some figure skating competition recently. There was a non-Australia, non-aboriginal couple dressed as though they were aboriginal, using the instrument in their piece. Some thought it was offensive. Didn't actually see the piece.

angelcel said...

I wonder who first realised that these hollow branches would make for good instruments. They're such an intrinsically Australian sound and it fascinates me how the player is able to produce a continuous low rumble.

Donna said...

Wonder what they sound like?!!...Great shots Gordon!!
hughugs

Gordon said...

Donna - I will endeavour to video a digeridoo being played and post it sometime in the future.

RuneE said...

It was nice to see this instrument in its proper use. I once saw and heard it played in London, but I think the musician was a rastafari from Jamaica.

J Bar said...

Great shots.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Ann said...

Just watched this evening's news when one of the rugby league ( I think it was league) used the field post as a digeridoo. Did you watch that?

I wanted to buy one but the new Zealand Govt doesn't allow timber products to come in NZ. I suppose if I paid a hefty sum to fumigate it, I could.